Of geeks and nerdy things

Sep 20

marine-science:

Methods of coral restoration are being applied in many parts of the world, including Florida, Mozambique and the Caribbean islands. Fast growing, branching species are being reared by conservationists and scientists and used for “reef seeding” projects. 

"It sounds quite novel, but in fact its a science thats been around for about 30 years. One of the reasons why I’m drawn to it is because its a very active way to get people physically involved in protecting the ocean."

Photo credits: top, middle, second from bottom, bottom

Sep 20
standavis:

Manta Ray Manta ray getting cleaned by beccachan

standavis:

Manta Ray Manta ray getting cleaned by beccachan

Sep 20
Sep 20
Sep 20

markscherz:

Phelsuma pusilla Mertens, 1964

Distribution:

Phelsuma p. pusilla is widely distributed in eastern Madagascar. Phelsuma p. hallmanni is found only around Andasibe in eastern Madagascar.

Morphology & Colouration:

Phelsuma pusilla is a very small gecko species, reaching a maximum total length of 85-100 mm (100 mm in males of P. p. hallmanni). Like all Phelsuma species, these geckos have a strongly reduced first toe, round pupils, and lack claws. The tail is distinctly verticillated.

These geckos are dorsally green with red spots, although the spots are often lacking in females. There is an arrangement of these red spots on the snout similar to most species in the P. lineata clade. In P. p. hallmanni, one of these red spots forms a bar between and just anterior to the eyes, and the snout is often blue. These geckos possess a dark lateral stripe that is always noticeable. The tail can be teal or turquoise, and the ventral side is whitish. 

Habits:

These geckos are arboreal and diurnal. Phelsuma p. pusilla is frequently found on palms, banana plants, and in urban environments. It is less frequently encountered in rainforest. By contrast, P. p. hallmanni is found on trees at the edge of mid-altitude rainforest, and not on buildings, and is apparently rare.

The juveniles of P. p. hallmanni are grey with lots of tiny blue/white spots, whereas those of P. p. pusilla are greenish.

Conservation Status:

Phelsuma pusilla is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, due to its apparently wide distribution and commonness. Phelsuma p. hallmanni may be rarer and more threatened because it is not found outside forests.

Taxonomy and Systematics:

Phelsuma pusilla belongs to the P. lineata group (Rocha et al. 2010), and is closest related to P. lineataP. kely, and P. comorensis. It possesses two subspecies, P. p. pusilla, and P. p. hallmanni, which have been described above.

Phylogeny:

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Gekkonidae-Phelsuma-P. pusilla

Photo is a male P. p. hallmanni, photographed by Henry Cook.

Click here to see more TaxonFiles!

References:

Glaw, F. and M. Vences. 2007. A Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Köln, Germany

Rocha, S., H. Rösler, P.-S. Gehring, F. Glaw, D. Posada, D.J. Harris and M. Vences. 2010. Phylogenetic systematics of day geckos, genus Phelsuma, based on molecular and morphological data (Squamata: Gekkonidae). Zootaxa 2429:1-28

Sep 18

rneerkat:

rneerkat:

rneerkat:

what do boxes breath

boxygen

image

i stand corrected

Sep 18
marissagiersch:

justjenaynayy:

dolphinboy420:

i dont think i’ve ever been so frustrated

Orange you glad it’s not a banana 

it happened

marissagiersch:

justjenaynayy:

dolphinboy420:

i dont think i’ve ever been so frustrated

Orange you glad it’s not a banana

it happened
Sep 18
yung-barce:

Bill! Bill! Bill! Bill! BILL!

yung-barce:

Bill! Bill! Bill! Bill! BILL!

Sep 18

thomasthewhaler:

Guys, let me tell about this awesome lizard. Yes, this is a limbless lizard, not a snake.

This kid is Anguis fragilis (slow worm / blind worm) and it’s a lizard that I’ve known since a child, because we had to memorize it’s not a snake.

They are very helpful in gardens as they eat insects, they are harmless and stuff anf they can lose (and regrow) their tail in case they feel threatened.

They are amazing, but also a protected species, their numbers are decreasing a lot.

Oh yeah, they can grow up to 45-50 cm and they can live up to 30 years in the wild.

(You can go read up more of them on wiki as i am unable to translate all my Czech knowledge to english).

Sep 18